Fast Food

Tiger Salad

Salad favourite of the Uighurs

What is it?
Tiger Salad, better known as laohu cai, originated amongst the Uighurs of Xinjiang, in the far west of China. The dish is also popular in Mongolia.
Typically, it consists of spring onions, green pepper, red chilli and coriander, cut into very fine julienne strips and mixed with a fierce sauce of garlic, sesame oil, soy sauce, vinegar and a lot of chilli.
The outcome is a refreshingly crisp salad, served as a side dish or appetizer. Good as an accompaniment to a beer, or when waiting for the rest of your meal to arrive.
What is Xinjiang cuisine?
Less popular than other cuisines like Cantonese or Sichuanese, the food in Xinjiang province incorporates Central Asian and Turkic fare.
Most Uighurs are Muslim, so pork is off the menu, and is normally replaced by roast mutton and kebab dishes, most of which are eaten by hand.
Another signature Uighur dish is la mian, a type of handmade or hand-stretched noodle, usually served with stir-fry meat like lamb, beef, or alternatively with vegetables.
Literally, la is to pull or stretch, while mian means noodle.
Where to eat it?
If you are in Beijing, Urumqi’s Beijing Office Xinjiang Restaurant, 1 Chegongzhuang Beidajie, Xicheng District. West of Guanyuanqiao on West Second Ring Road (Tel: 8610 6836-2795).
If you are in Hong Kong Manchu Bistro is another good option. It is located at 33 Elgin Street, Soho, (Tel: 852 2536-9218).

What is it?

Tiger Salad, better known as laohu cai, originated amongst the Uighurs of Xinjiang, in the far west of China. The dish is also popular in Mongolia.

Typically, it consists of spring onions, green pepper, red chilli and coriander, cut into very fine julienne strips and mixed with a fierce sauce of garlic, sesame oil, soy sauce, vinegar and a lot of chilli.

The outcome is a refreshingly crisp salad, served as a side dish or appetizer. Good as an accompaniment to a beer, or when waiting for the rest of your meal to arrive.

What is Xinjiang cuisine?

Less popular than other cuisines like Cantonese or Sichuanese, the food in Xinjiang province incorporates Central Asian and Turkic fare.

Most Uighurs are Muslim, so pork is off the menu, and is normally replaced by roast mutton and kebab dishes, most of which are eaten by hand.

Another signature Uighur dish is la mian, a type of handmade or hand-stretched noodle, usually served with stir-fry meat like lamb, beef, or alternatively with vegetables.

Literally, la is to pull or stretch, while mian means noodle.

Where to eat it?

If you are in Beijing, Urumqi’s Beijing Office Xinjiang Restaurant, 1 Chegongzhuang Beidajie, Xicheng District. West of Guanyuanqiao on West Second Ring Road (Tel: 8610 6836-2795).

If you are in Hong Kong Manchu Bistro is another good option. It is located at 33 Elgin Street, Soho, (Tel: 852 2536-9218).


© ChinTell Ltd. All rights reserved.

Exclusively sponsored by HSBC.

The Week in China website and the weekly magazine publications are owned and maintained by ChinTell Limited, Hong Kong. Neither HSBC nor any member of the HSBC group of companies ("HSBC") endorses the contents and/or is involved in selecting, creating or editing the contents of the Week in China website or the Week in China magazine. The views expressed in these publications are solely the views of ChinTell Limited and do not necessarily reflect the views or investment ideas of HSBC. No responsibility will therefore be assumed by HSBC for the contents of these publications or for the errors or omissions therein.