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The new orient express

But assembled in America...

Something new for America’s China-bashers to rail about?

On January 28, President Obama signed off on a plan to build 13 high-speed rail routes. Tim Schweikert, the China president of GE Transportation, told the South China Morning Post that the American multinational was in discussions with China’s Ministry of Railways to use Chinese technology to build them. “We’re going to need to bring high-speed rail technology from outside because there is no indigenous high-speed railway technology in the US,” said Schweikert. “China is the world leader in high-speed rail. We plan to leverage Chinese technology.” He says the plan will be to make 80% of tSomething new for America’s China-bashers to rail about?

On January 28, President Obama signed off on a plan to build 13 high-speed rail routes. Tim Schweikert, the China president of GE Transportation, told the South China Morning Post that the American multinational was in discussions with China’s Ministry of Railways to use Chinese technology to build them. “We’re going to need to bring high-speed rail technology from outside because there is no indigenous high-speed railway technology in the US,” said Schweikert. “China is the world leader in high-speed rail. We plan to leverage Chinese technology.” He says the plan will be to make 80% of the components in the US, so while the technology will be ‘Made in China’, the trains themselves, technically, will not. “High-speed rail is the reversal of the basic model, as it takes Chinese technology to the US for manufacture by US workers,” comments Schweikert (for more on GE’s China strategy see WiC48).he components in the US, so while the technology will be ‘Made in China’, the trains themselves, technically, will not. “High-speed rail is the reversal of the basic model, as it taChinese technology to the US for manufacture by US workers,” comments Schweikert (for more on GE’s China strategy see WiC48).


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