Planet China

Tickets, please

One of the more improbable tourist attractions in Paris is its sewer system where visitors can pay €4.30 ($5.80) for an hour-long tour of the world’s most stylish underground gutters. Over in the city of Xi’an, famed for its Terracotta Army, tourists have also been traversing subterranean sewerage. Xi’an is also known for its ancient city walls, which cost about Rmb40 ($6.53) to visit. Some tourists seem reluctant to pay. According to Chinese Business View, they’ve discovered that they can avoid the ticketing desk if they climb into a sewer and go under the wall to get access. Its reporter witnessed a tour group emerging from the sewer near the Xuanwu Gate doing just this earlier this month, although he warned that the risks to health seemed to outweigh the savings on the ticket price.
Meanwhile, back in Paris, CNN has been reporting on another ticketing scam involving Chinese tourists. This time the Louvre museum is the victim. In August it discovered that thousands of fake entry tickets had been produced when a staff member had doubts about a ticket handed over by a Chinese tour guide. Belgian customs officials then seized a package from China containing 4,000 counterfeit entry passes for the Louvre. This has prompted suspicions a Chinese firm is behind the ruse.

One of the more improbable tourist attractions in Paris is its sewer system where visitors can pay €4.30 ($5.80) for an hour-long tour of the world’s most stylish underground gutters. Over in the city of Xi’an, famed for its Terracotta Army, tourists have also been traversing subterranean sewerage. Xi’an is also known for its ancient city walls, which cost about Rmb40 ($6.53) to visit. Some tourists seem reluctant to pay. According to Chinese Business View, they’ve discovered that they can avoid the ticketing desk if they climb into a sewer and go under the wall to get access. Its reporter witnessed a tour group emerging from the sewer near the Xuanwu Gate doing just this earlier this month, although he warned that the risks to health seemed to outweigh the savings on the ticket price.

Meanwhile, back in Paris, CNN has been reporting on another ticketing scam involving Chinese tourists. This time the Louvre museum is the victim. In August it discovered that thousands of fake entry tickets had been produced when a staff member had doubts about a ticket handed over by a Chinese tour guide. Belgian customs officials then seized a package from China containing 4,000 counterfeit entry passes for the Louvre. This has prompted suspicions a Chinese firm is behind the ruse.


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