Sino-File

 Australia’s eye in the sky

 Australia’s eye in the sky
Apr 1, 2022 (WiC 579)
“This is a perfect location for a lot of things we need to do. If they can look up and help us characterise what’s happening in space, particularly with some of the things we’ve seen with the Chinese”

US Space Command’s head General James Dickinson spoke this week during a visit to the joint US-Australia intelligence facility at Pine Gap, near Alice Springs in the middle of Australia. Pine Gap, he said, is instrumental for the operation of American reconnaissance satellites and could help the US counter Chinese hypersonic weapons.

Too reliant on China?

Too reliant on China?
Mar 25, 2022 (WiC 578)
“I think it’s still an asset, China will be by far the biggest growth market for the foreseeable future. For autonomous driving, connected cars, electric cars – they will be the main market”

Hubert Diess, CEO of Volkswagen, admitted to political challenges for the German carmaker in China following Russia’s invasion of Ukraine. VW makes a car sale in China every 9.5 seconds and earns half its annual profits there. In a major Financial Times article Diess disagreed with the idea that VW needs to become less reliant on the Chinese market: “If you are not in China, you have a problem. If you are in China, you have a chance.”

Standing by his forecast

Standing by his forecast
Mar 11, 2022 (WiC 576)
“I’m pretty confident in my estimate that China will surpass the US by 2030”

Justin Lin, former vice-president of the World Bank and now a professor at Peking University, reiterated his estimate this week that the Chinese economy will be bigger than the American one by 2030. “The Russia-Ukraine war will have an impact on China, but it will also affect the US. All countries will see a slower pace of growth,” Lin said during the Two Sessions parliamentary gathering.

Abe’s big declaration

Abe’s big declaration
Mar 4, 2022 (WiC 575)
“The people of Taiwan share our universal values, so I think the US should firmly abandon its ambiguity”

Former Japanese leader Abe Shinzo told a Japanese television show that Washington should promise to defend Taiwan against any invasion and abandon its policy of “strategic ambiguity”. Also significantly, he said Japan should start a debate on the once taboo subject of obtaining nuclear weapons – given threats from North Korea and the military rise of China.